Two Women Who Were Switched At Birth Share Their Story

TODAY

The experience of giving birth in a hospital today is a lot different than it was when we were born and when our parents were born. Decades ago, it wasn’t common for dads to be in the delivery room with the mother. It also wasn’t common for the baby to be in the recovery room with the mother for very long. Instead, babies were sent to the nursery where friends and family could look at them through a large glass window.

Things are much different now. It’s quite common for dads and babies to stay with the mother during the entire hospital stay. The doctors and nurses visit the new mom and baby in the recovery room instead of sending the baby to another room.

These changes are probably in place for several reasons. As parents, we can’t imagine how difficult it would be to be handed your new baby only to have the baby placed in a different room a short while later. In addition, being separated adds risk.

We’re talking about the risk of babies getting switched at birth.

In May 1964, Kathryn Jones gave birth to a baby girl. She named her daughter Tina and loved her from the moment she held her in her arms.

Fast forward to 2019, and Tina, who was 55 at the time, decided to take an Ancestry.com DNA test. It was her daughter’s idea. She wanted to try to find a grandfather she had never met and hoped the test would help.

When Tina got the results back, she was quite confused and decided to ask her mom to take the test as well. Her mom’s test results were quite different than hers. The family trees didn’t match.

That’s when Tina’s daughter decided to do some digging. She ultimately discovered that her mom must have been switched at birth. Through social media, she even located the woman who her mom was switched with.

Watch the video below to learn more about Tina and Kathryn’s story.

Tina told The Daily Beast that when she realized she had been switched at birth, “my heart sank.” She added, “Jill got to be with my real parents, and now she gets to be with my parents I grew up with. I didn’t know what to think about it at first, but the more I think about it, it makes me really sad.”