Supermarket Keeps Retraining Employee With Dementia So She Can Continue Working

Image of D Salomon's mother.Doron Salomon via Twitter

While some companies are making headlines – in a bad way – because of how they treat their employees, this is a story that goes against the grain. A U.K. supermarket is in the spotlight for being a tremendous help to one grateful family.

Sainsbury’s employed Doron Salomon’s mother since 2012 and continued to keep her on staff after she was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s in 2013. She was hired as a “picker” to handle online orders and her title never changed, and Sainsbury’s has been aware of her condition and updates since her diagnosis.

After her physician deemed her unemployable sometime in 2017, the store kept her working for six more months. They did so by evolving her role and retraining her.

In a series of tweets, Salomon wanted to publicly thank the store for giving his mom “a sense of dignity and self-worth” following her diagnosis. He said that each time his father was called to the store, he thought it would be the end of her job. Instead, they wanted to learn more about her condition and what they could do to help.

At times, she would walk into the store confused, but staff were always kind and compassionate. Her final role was that of “tote cleaner.”

Salomon’s mom’s last day was March 3, 2018, about six months after being declared as “unemployable.” He went on to thank everyone at the store and talked about Alzheimer’s, encouraging people to donate Alzheimer’s Research UK.

The thread of tweets inspired others to share their appreciation for Sainsbury’s and started a discussion about the impact of Alzheimer’s. For their part, Sainsbury’s responded with this tweet:

Health experts recommend helping those with dementia by giving them small tasks, as it can help keep them calm and boost their mood. What this store did for this lady was a truly wonderful thing!

Did this story warm your heart too? Are you a fan of Sainsbury’s now even if you don’t live near one? Has something similar be done for your loved one with dementia?

Source:

BBC